How to source apparel in China: The Basics

I don’t take on a lot of apparel projects even though I get inquires from small apparel companies a few times a month.  The reason is that I don’t have a lot of experience with apparel and it is outside my comfort zone. A few years ago I somewhat reluctantly agreed to do an apparel inspection in China for a company I know.  I found it very challenging simply because I did not have a lot of experience in garment sewing, which is very different and far more complex than home textiles sewing, where I do have a lot of experience. In fact I spent a few years in Home Textiles production in China and in that time I learned how difficult textile production can be, from achieving the right colors on fabrics to the intricacies of CMT ( Cut, Manufacture and Trim).  But even my experience in home textiles did not prepare me for the severity of inspecting a 30,000 pc apparel order in China. Just the notion of stitch geometry or the myriad handling strategies when sewing a garment depending on the shape of the fabric is enough to scare one off.

Yet, even though I don’t generally take on apparel products I do know some basic things you need to consider when you are sourcing apparel in China.  And these are the things so few people include when they approach me with a project request:  Accordingly here they are:

  • Pantones for all fabrics, logos etc. Pantone books are very expensive but if you are sourcing apparel overseas having a Pantone book is indispensible.  And the best Panton book ( and there are many) are those with multiple pantone chips of the same color – so you can send a vendor one pantone and have extras for yourself.   Do not think your project will go well if you don’t provide your vendor with a specific pantone.
  • Sizing in CM, find a sizing chart online showing differences between US/European and Chinese. Don’t just assume that your vendor knows US sizing charts because they have manufactured for US customers before. You would be surprised at the stories I hear e.g. medium sized garments coming in from China that fit like XS here in the US.
  • What kind of fabric you need. Be very specific here.  Type of fabric e.g. if cotton what kind of cotton. Is it Gingham, Flannelette, Pima etc etc  ; Weight. Usually measured as the weight per one meter of fabric/weave  g. plain, satin, twill etc etc  etc.  It is not to be expected that you will know all this info off the top of your head but you need to know it. The best way is to go down to your local fabric store and ask them to tell you what the fabric is. And then go to another fabric store to double check the info you have been given.
  • Detailed patterns done on CAD. Check with the vendor to see which format they need CAD in. There are several formats.
  • Components (if applicable) buttons, zippers etc. Specify these as best you can. The more info you give your vendor, the cheaper your cost will likely be. Not only does it project to the vendor your knowledge of your own product but it decreases the likelihood that they will source a more expensive component for you than you actually need.
  • Labeling requirements. These are important and will impact cost. You need to include all fonts.
  • Testing requirements. Never to be overlooked with any product and essential for any apparel product being imported from China.

Be prepared to have to meet MOQs per design/color and even size.  The reason is that the factories that sew your garments are are ordering fabric from 3rd party suppliers.  The CMT factories do not make their own fabric and therefore they face MOQs as well from their own fabric suppliers. I see so many people who have a new apparel line and they want to have as many SKUS as possible because it makes their line more attractive. But they don’t understand where factories in China get their own fabric and that  there are very stiff MOQs for fabric.   So you have to always think the fewer SKUs the better. At least when you are starting out.

Finally, make sure you have plenty of fabric on-hand so you can send prospective vendors fabric swatches. There is no substitute for providing the vendor with an actual sample of the exact type of fabric you want to work with.  And, once again, the fabric store is the best place to go.

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