An American CEO who is jaded by China

I sat down yesterday with a local entrepreneur. He owns a chemical products company that he established ten years ago and the company has grown from 5 to 10 employees over the last year.   He wanted to talk to me about China or, more aptly put, he wanted to complain about China.  He detailed for me some of the challenges he has faced there over the last ten years.  Among the things he told me:

  • He hired a Chinese employee only to have that employ take his formulas and set up his own company in China. And then this ex-employee had the gall to approach his former boss and offer to be a supplier. Because the prices were good the American could not resist and he is now buying his own product from someone who stole that product from him!  I have heard these outrageous but true stories so many times before.   There is no way to avoid situations like this but by making sure you vett the people you are employing as thoroughly as possible. I should have asked about his hiring process but I didn’t. But a good tip is this if you are protective of your IP you should never hire anyone but a US citizen or permanent resident who can be held accountable under terms of an NDA.
  • As a side venture the entrepreneur tried to export California wine to China, under private label, only to find that he had to register his designs with the Chinese govt. and was forced to have a Joint Venture (JV) partner. He seemed to think this was just opening the door to getting ripped off again. Of course it is. But as I explained to him if you are making a good profit off of China, it shouldn’t bother you if your JV partner in China is making a good profit off of you.
  • He attempted to learn Chinese believing that it is very important to speak the language of the country where you are doing business. I couldn’t agree more.  He mentioned what a hard language it was to learn.   But he said that he was forced to give up his studies when the SARS epidemic broke out, believing that he would not be able to spend time in China to practice. I don’t know what to say here but it does not sound like he made a sustained effort.  And that is what it takes to learn Chinese, a sustained effort. It is a hard language. He is correct.
  • He wanted to know how I had avoided becoming jaded when dealing with China over the years. I told him about George Kates, an American antiquarian who lived in China in the 1930s and wrote a book about his experience entitled “The Years That Were Fat.” George Kates, The Years That Were Fat  Kates spent seven years in China and he said that in order to live in China the one thing that is most important is patience. So, yes, patience is the most important thing when you do business in China.  Another key to succeeding in China is that you have to like China.  If you don’t like China, don’t like the food, the people, the history or culture, it is probably not a place you should locate your business. You will get jaded quickly as I sense he has.

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