Required reading for anyone thinking about sourcing in China

I was thinking this morning how many times over the years people have told me how they were cheated when they sourced in China. One of the better articles I have read on this subject appeared in 2013 in Inc Magazine.  The article describes the trials and tribulations of one entrepreneur from Ann Arbor Mi who learned the hard way that doing business in China is not easy. It is such Ona good article, in fact voted one of the best business articles in 2013, that I usually send the link to prospective clients who are approaching me to help them.  I see it as required reading for anyone who is thinking of doing business in China. INC Magazine article

 

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An American CEO who is jaded by China

I sat down yesterday with a local entrepreneur. He owns a chemical products company that he established ten years ago and the company has grown from 5 to 10 employees over the last year.   He wanted to talk to me about China or, more aptly put, he wanted to complain about China.  He detailed for me some of the challenges he has faced there over the last ten years.  Among the things he told me:

  • He hired a Chinese employee only to have that employ take his formulas and set up his own company in China. And then this ex-employee had the gall to approach his former boss and offer to be a supplier. Because the prices were good the American could not resist and he is now buying his own product from someone who stole that product from him!  I have heard these outrageous but true stories so many times before.   There is no way to avoid situations like this but by making sure you vett the people you are employing as thoroughly as possible. I should have asked about his hiring process but I didn’t. But a good tip is this if you are protective of your IP you should never hire anyone but a US citizen or permanent resident who can be held accountable under terms of an NDA.
  • As a side venture the entrepreneur tried to export California wine to China, under private label, only to find that he had to register his designs with the Chinese govt. and was forced to have a Joint Venture (JV) partner. He seemed to think this was just opening the door to getting ripped off again. Of course it is. But as I explained to him if you are making a good profit off of China, it shouldn’t bother you if your JV partner in China is making a good profit off of you.
  • He attempted to learn Chinese believing that it is very important to speak the language of the country where you are doing business. I couldn’t agree more.  He mentioned what a hard language it was to learn.   But he said that he was forced to give up his studies when the SARS epidemic broke out, believing that he would not be able to spend time in China to practice. I don’t know what to say here but it does not sound like he made a sustained effort.  And that is what it takes to learn Chinese, a sustained effort. It is a hard language. He is correct.
  • He wanted to know how I had avoided becoming jaded when dealing with China over the years. I told him about George Kates, an American antiquarian who lived in China in the 1930s and wrote a book about his experience entitled “The Years That Were Fat.” George Kates, The Years That Were Fat  Kates spent seven years in China and he said that in order to live in China the one thing that is most important is patience. So, yes, patience is the most important thing when you do business in China.  Another key to succeeding in China is that you have to like China.  If you don’t like China, don’t like the food, the people, the history or culture, it is probably not a place you should locate your business. You will get jaded quickly as I sense he has.

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China sourcing from the perspective of a Hong Kong Sourcing Agent

I had an email the other day from a Chinese sourcing agent who is based in Hong Kong, Chris Lo.  Chris said he enjoyed my blog and wanted to offer a few useful observations about sourcing in China from the perspective of an on-the-ground local Hong Kong sourcing manager.  Accordingly, here they are ( his observations in Italics ) :

  • Chris writes that when you deal with suppliers in China it is always good to use a factory with Hong Kong or Taiwanese management if you can find one.

This is correct.  The reason is obvious, the HK and Taiwanese managers are just more in tune with Western and Japanese business practices and they tend to manage their factories well.  The only caveat is that you will probably end up paying more for your product than you would were you to use a Chinese mainland managed factory.  Still, I think it is worth paying a little more to get better communication and often better quality and for this reason if you do have a choice between giving an order to a Hong Kong managed FTY or a Mainland managed FTY, you should always give the order to the Hong Kong/Taiwanese FTY even if the cost is greater.

  • Chris mentions that as the Guangdong Government is trying to phase out Low Cost Manufacturing, many industries are relocating to the Eastern China, Zhejiang, Shanghai, Jiangsu i.e. The Changjiang Delta area as opposed to the Pearl River Delta area in Guangdong. He says that he has heard from other Hong Kong based sourcing agents that the MOQs are very high in these areas now, while quality tends to lag.  One reason is that these are bigger FTYs and they need bigger orders to stay afloat.

That the Central Govt is trying to phase out Low Cost Manufacturing in the South of China has become something of a standard line in recent years.  Nothing new here.  But this is the first time I have heard  about higher MOQs and lower quality coming out of suppliers in Eastern China.  I think this makes sense because manufacturing around Shanghai, in places like Zhejiang and Jiangsu tends to be on a larger scale.  I have been in a lot of huge textile and furniture factories there over the years, much larger than anything I have ever seen in other parts of China. So it is quite natural that these bigger FTYs need bigger orders to stay afloat. I am not sure about the quality statement.  I think it depends on the industry and product.  I do think that the South is still a good choice to source products because the infrastructure and product knowledge have been there for several decades whereas only in recent years has other manufacturing moved up north. Of course I would qualify this by saying that once again it depends on the product and industry.

  • Chris mentions that Fujian Province is a good place to manufacture now. He says it is a very good place to send your apparel projects and that all of the big global brands have production there.

I was not aware of Fujian Province’s strength as a textile producing base. I have made 2-3 trips to Fujian Province over the last 10 years and my sense there is that prices are very low, but that quality is an issue.  But these were not textile orders I was working on so I would not know. Still, I would be a little cautious sourcing in Fujian Province. It does not have the infrastructure that the low cost South has, nor the sophistication that areas feeding Shanghai have e.g. Zhejiang and Jiangsu.

Finally I would like to quote Chris verbatim for something he says about the ease of online sourcing these days:

“Doing business in China without regular checking would have a high chance going wrong (but I guess it is same for everywhere.). So to me I’d like to comment also on the emerging e-platform, I think it is just for gaining exposure for the suppliers but you cannot do industrial production without directly getting to your supplier, having face to face meeting and in-line inspection; the old fashion way of visiting industry fairs, factory visits still has place a good value for doing so. Industrial production is not talking about selling one item with simple emails and clicks.” 

I like that about the “old-fashioned” way of sourcing.  I agree, it is just a much safer way to go about it. 

Thanks Chris !

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