Is there any way around MOQs ? Unfortunately not.

One issue that small companies and start ups grapple with all the time when they source overseas is MOQ (Minimum Order Quantity).  I don’t think a week goes by when I don’t get an inquiry from a small company that wants to source a product in China but in very small QTYs, in many cases just a few hundred units. For example, a few weeks back a London based women’s apparel start-up emailed me.  They have 20 designs and want to order between 100-200 pcs per design.  They want good quality and a low cost.  I told them that I saw this as a very challenging project and I suggested that the only way to do this would be to reduce the number of designs and increase the order QTY per design. Only in that way could they think of meeting the fabric MOQs that vendors in China would likely be facing were they to take this order.  Like many small companies that hold steadfast to their designs, this company said they didn’t want to eliminate any designs and that was the last I heard from them.  I imagine they are back on alibaba looking for suppliers.

Although there are suppliers in China that will accept small orders, these are generally not reputable suppliers and if you do place an order with a vendor like this you might just be throwing away your money. The vendor makes a small profit and sends you an order you cannot sell.  I have seen it happen many times.

Just out of curiosity I went online to see how other sourcing consultants handle the issue of MOQ. In other words is there any way around MOQ ?   Some of the advice I saw is as follows:  limit product customization; negotiate a lower MOQ; pay a higher unit cost; streamline material usage; focus on buying from small suppliers etc etc. Let’s look at these strategies:

  • Simplifying product design. Conceivably, the only way this would get you around an MOQ would be if you were simplifying design to cut unit cost so you could order more of a product to meet an MOQ.  It sounds good in theory but I have never in fact seen a company do this.  Companies that change a design do so to lower costs, not to increase their costs.  I would add that modifications to a product design, unless major, usually result in very insignificant cost reductions.  But, as I said, I have never heard of a company doing this.
  • Negotiate a lower MOQ. I think this only works with vendors with whom you have had a longstanding relationship. They want to maintain the relationship and therefore will sometimes waive MOQ requirements.  This happens all the time. On the other hand, if you negotiate a lower MOQ with with a first time vendor, they will just seek to cut costs in your production and you may end up with goods you can’t sell.  I always advise companies not to get into protracted negotiations with first time suppliers because it just sends the relationship in the wrong direction from the get-go.  But OK if you are trying to get around an MOQ with a longstanding vendor.  It never hurts to ask.
  • Pay a higher unit cost. What you will have to do if you want to order less than the MOQ. If you have target costs this may make your project untenable. It also locks you into a higher price as your orders get bigger. Yet this is what many companies have to do to get around MOQ.
  • Streamline material usage: Not realistic unless you have a product you can do this with. Most small companies don’t.
  • Buy from small suppliers. Small suppliers are usually not reputable suppliers.  If you have any kind of strict design requirements, you will not have success with small suppliers who simply do not have the expertise to handle challenging designs/orders.

In fact, the only thing I advise small companies to do when they are inquiring with a China vendor about MOQ is NOT to ask the vendor first what their MOQ is but instead to give the vendor 3 QTYs to quote on, one for the minimum they think they can order and then in increments accordingly. For example if I wanted to make a wooden picture frame in China I might reach out to vendors and tell them that I am interested in QTYs of 1000/2500/5000 and ask them to quote on each QTY accordingly.  If the vendor really wants my business, they will quote me on my terms and will not mention their own MOQ, even though they may in fact have one.  I think this is really the only way to get around MOQ. But even this strategy has its limits because many vendors will just come back to you and tell you that they have an MOQ.

In short, this is why overseas sourcing is so challenging, because no matter how cheap the unit price is, you are not going to get that unit price unless you order a far bigger QTY of product than you might be able to sell.

 

IMG_6725

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s